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Identifier: F.2013-08-0003
16mm home movies of Oak Park and Downtown Chicago shot between 1929 and 1930. Features footage of Museum Campus and other important landmarks, while also documenting Beryl Simon's stay at Fair Oaks Avenue with a friend.
The films in this collection were made and collected by Chicago area film critic and filmmaker Bill Stamets. The bulk of the collection consists of Super 8 films and outtakes made by Stamets in the 1970s and 1980s. They depict political events primarily in the city of Chicago, including former Chicago Mayor Harold Washington's two election campaigns, inaugurations, and time in office; numerous street protests and marches; and cultural festivals around the city. Also in the collection are nine 16mm film prints consisting of 3 films made by Chicago filmmaker Tom Palazzolo and 6 films by Stan Brakhage.
Identifier: F.2007-02-0001
Identifier: F.2004-02-0095
Identifier: F.2003-01-0004
The Cynthia Holmberg Collection consists of 16mm home movies shot primarily by Henry Brooks, Cynthia’s father, and 8mm home movies shot by Cynthia’s husband Ron Holmberg. Ranging from the late 1930s to the mid-1960s, the 16mm films document Cynthia’s childhood and the life of a middle class family living in Chicago. The 8mm home movies document Ron and Cynthia Holmberg’s family and life in the suburbs of Chicago in the 1970s and early 80s. They include various locations around Chicago as well as family trips to Wisconsin, various U.S. National Parks, and Florida.
The Dan Andries Collection is a collection of 16mm and 8mm films, some of which were produced by Fred Niemann Productions and sponsored by the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Dan Andries found this collection of mid-20th century films outside of the radio station WFMT, the likely previous home of these films. Alongside these films were labels and shot lists suggesting the films’ content as prohibition melodrama, various depictions of urban life, shoreline vistas, and even some footage shot outside Illinois: Florida, California, Alaska.
The David Gray Collection contains home movies shot by Uriel Hadley of St. Louis, Missouri. Highlights include footage shot at the Chicago World’s Fair (A Century of Progress International Exhibition) in 1933-34, the St. Louis Botanical Gardens and holiday celebrations with the family. Hadley worked for Eastman Kodak and he often shot these home movies on or with the latest technology being developed by the company.
LORD THING (DeWitt Beall, 1970)
This collection of films was made by filmmaker DeWitt Beall in Chicago during the 1960s. A large portion of the collection consists of elements and prints related to LORD THING, a film about a Chicago-based gang named the Conservative Vice Lords. The film was never released, but won an award at the Venice Film Festival in 1971. Various other educational films, documentaries and PSAs are in this collection, including the EARTHKEEPING series which aired on PBS in the early 1970s.
The Kautzer Collection is a pair of nitrate 35mm reels. Circa 1929, the two films are newsreels from the Chicago Daily News depicting parades, celebrations and noteworthy instances in and around Chicago from the time, e.g. the crowning of Miss Illinois, the celebrating of new fawn at the Lincoln Park Zoo, the commemorating of Veterans from three different wars in a Veterans’ March, and a fatal car accident at 91st and Buffalo St.
Home movies and short films shot or collected by Chicago artist and muralist Don McIlvaine. The collection primarily consists of home movies from Chicago's North Lawndale and Bronzeville neighborhoods, including footage of mural works in progress and scenes from McIlvaine's "Art and Soul" classroom in North Lawndale. The collection also includes home movies documenting McIlvaine's travels, including a trip to Haiti and a young Conservative Vice Lords camping trip. Also in the collection are interview films, one with Chicago Bear's football player Gale Sayers as well as a 1972 interview with American political activist and scholar Angela Davis.
These film materials consist of news footage Frank Koza shot from the mid 1930s through the late 1980s. They contain local, national and international news events.
This black and white 16mm film depicts the leisure activities of an affluent family on Chicago's north side. Scenes include a grandiose building that is possibly the Edgewater Beach Hotel and a football game at University of Chicago.
The Glick-Berolzheimer Collection contains home movies by Diane Berolzheimer's father Jacob Glick from the mid 1930s through the early 1960s. It also includes home movies made by Diane and her husband Karl Berolzheimer from the mid 1950s through the mid 1970s. The home movies in this collection depict the leisure activities of the larger Glick/Berolzheimer family, rituals of Jewish life, and numerous fishing trips by Mr. Glick.